September 21, 2017 11:53 GMT by dailymail.co.uk

China re-launches world's fastest bullet train at 217 mph

Super-fast 'Fuxing' bullet trains, put to use today, cut down the travel time between Shanghai and Beijing, the two main cities in China, to four hours and 28 minutes.

China today raised the maximum speed of its bullet trains to 217 mph (350 kmh) - six years after a fatal high-speed railway crash had shocked the world.

The new bullet trains, called 'Fuxing', are said to be the fastest commercially used trains in the world.

The super-fast locomotives cut down the travel time between Shanghai and Beijing, the two main cities in China, from five hours to four hours and 28 minutes. In the 1990s, the same journey could take a day and a night.

A quick journey: The Fuxing bullet train runs on the Beijing-Shanghai Railway in Changzhou in China's eastern Jiangsu province on September 21. China raised the maximum speed of its bullet trains back to 217 mph (350kmh) today six years after a speed cap was imposed

A quick journey: The Fuxing bullet train runs on the Beijing-Shanghai Railway in Changzhou in China's eastern Jiangsu province on September 21. China raised the maximum speed of its bullet trains back to 217 mph (350kmh) today six years after a speed cap was imposed

Ready to be impressed: A passenger takes a selfie with a Fuxing bullet train before it departs from Beijing South Railway Station to Shanghai today. With a top speed of 248 mph (400 kmh), Fuxing is said to be the world's fastest commercially used bullet train

Ready to be impressed: A passenger takes a selfie with a Fuxing bullet train before it departs from Beijing South Railway Station to Shanghai today. With a top speed of 248 mph (400 kmh), Fuxing is said to be the world's fastest commercially used bullet train

Fatal crash: In 2011, a two-train collision near Wenzhou, eastern China, killed 40 people and injured 191 (pictured). The accident led the authority to put a speed cap on all bullet trains

Fatal crash: In 2011, a two-train collision near Wenzhou, eastern China, killed 40 people and injured 191 (pictured). The accident led the authority to put a speed cap on all bullet trains

In 2011, China ordered all bullet trains to lower its maximum speed from 217 mph to 186 mph (300 mph) after a collision involving two bullet trains near the city of Wenzhou had killed 40 people and injured 191.

Seven pairs of Fuxing bullet trains were put to use from midnight today on the Beijing-Shanghai railway line, the busiest railway line in China which serves 505,000 passengers daily.

Beijing said the latest speed increase was a milestone 'for the world's commercial railway service achieved by China', according to a commentary on the news from People's Daily Online.

All aboard! Super-fast Fuxing (pictured) cuts down the travel time between Shanghai and Beijing, the two main cities in China, from five hours to four hours and 28 minutes

All aboard! Super-fast Fuxing (pictured) cuts down the travel time between Shanghai and Beijing, the two main cities in China, from five hours to four hours and 28 minutes

Lightning speed: A Fuxing bullet train departs from Beijing South Railway Station to Shanghai, as the country restores the world's fastest bullet train which runs at 217 mph (350 kmh)

Lightning speed: A Fuxing bullet train departs from Beijing South Railway Station to Shanghai, as the country restores the world's fastest bullet train which runs at 217 mph (350 kmh)

China unveiled the glitzy Fuxing bullet trains on June 26. 

Fuxing, whose name means 'rejuvenation', boasts a top speed of 248 mph (400 kmh), which means it would take the train just an hour and 14 minutes to travel from London to Paris.

Fuxing is the first bullet train designed and manufactured by Chinese engineers without help from the West, according to Chinese state media.

Chinese companies spent 13 years learning to build the world-class high-speed train after acquiring know-how from leading firms in developed countries, such as Japan, France, Germany and Canada. 

Fuxing is said to be the first bullet train designed and manufactured by Chinese engineers without help from the West. Workers spent three years developing the model

Fuxing is said to be the first bullet train designed and manufactured by Chinese engineers without help from the West. Workers spent three years developing the model

China's high-speed railway network measures a staggering 13,670 miles (22,000 kilometres), which is about 60 per cent of the world's total. Pictured, A Fuxing bullet train (left) runs past a Hexie bullet train, the last bullet train model, on the Beijing-Shanghai Railway today

China's high-speed railway network measures a staggering 13,670 miles (22,000 kilometres), which is about 60 per cent of the world's total. Pictured, A Fuxing bullet train (left) runs past a Hexie bullet train, the last bullet train model, on the Beijing-Shanghai Railway today

Workers from more than 20 Chinese companies joined forces to form a core team in order to build Fuxing. The model was developed and built within three years.

The operator of the new trains is the China Railway Corporation, based in Beijing.

There are currently two models under the Fuxing series, namely CR400AF and CR400BF.  

The sleek and super-fast bullet trains are also more comfortable than China's previous bullet train models as they provide free Wi-Fi coverage and more legroom in all carriages.

Fuxing's on-board monitoring system has been described as 'sophisticated'. It could automatically slow the train in case of emergencies or abnormal conditions.  

Prior to Fuxing, China's bullet trains were called 'Hexie', or Harmony. 

The 'flying train' is a passenger pod that travels through a vacuum tube using magnetic levitation - similar to Elon Musk's Hyperloop, which is set to reach speeds of 760 mph

The 'flying train' is a passenger pod that travels through a vacuum tube using magnetic levitation - similar to Elon Musk's Hyperloop, which is set to reach speeds of 760 mph

China's high-speed railway network measures a staggering 13,670 miles (22,000 kilometres), which is about 60 per cent of the world's total.

Last month, the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC) announced it had started looking into creating a 'high-speed flying train' that could reach speeds of 2,485 mph (4,000kmh), according to state-run space contractors. 

If the project goes through as planned, this super train could move at four times the speed of commercial flights and three times the speed of sound. 

THE 'HIGH-SPEED FLYING TRAIN'

The 'flying train' is a passenger pod that travels through a vacuum tube using magnetic levitation - similar to Elon Musk's hyperloop.

If the train reaches these speeds it means it could whip along at four times the speed of commercial flights and three times the speed of sound.

Contractors claims their tube system will be the first designed for supersonic speeds - although their first aim to to hit more modest speeds of 621 mph (1,000 kmh).

Earlier this month, Hyperloop One completed the first successful test of the passenger pod for its radical transport system, travelling at historic speeds of 193 mph (310 kmh)

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