Former NFL star takes stand against anthem protest

Former NFL star Herschel Walker (left) shot daggers at the NFL anthem protest against police brutality and also at NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell (right) for not squashing them.

The NFL football player who was once a part of Donald Trump's defunct United States Football League New Jersey Generals in the 80s has spoken out against the NFL protest during the national anthem. 

Herschel Walker shot daggers at the protest geared at bringing attention to police brutality and also at NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell for not squashing them. 

'I absolutely think the protests are so upsetting, and I blame the commissioner,' he said to the New York Post.

'I know people are going to be angry when I say it, but he should have stopped the protests at the very beginning.'

Herschel Walker (pictured) shot daggers at the protest geared at bringing attention to police brutality and also at NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell for not squashing them

Herschel Walker (pictured) shot daggers at the protest geared at bringing attention to police brutality and also at NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell for not squashing them

'I absolutely think the protests are so upsetting, and I blame the commissioner,' he said to the New York Post

'I absolutely think the protests are so upsetting, and I blame the commissioner,' he said to the New York Post

Walker asserted that he understood the importance of the flag and black lives matter but felt that it wasn't the appropriate time to protest. 

'Guys, let me tell you this. Our flag is very special, and black lives matter, but what we should do is go to Washington after the season and protest there instead,' the Heisman Trophy winner added.

'We have young men and women fighting for the flag. And we have to respect the White House.' 

And while Walker's comments don't offer any actual solutions to help protest against police brutality, the former football player is showing just how nationalistic he can be. 

He felt that the players should go an protest in Washington if they wanted results and claimed to understand that black lives matter
Currently, he is partnering with the Rocky Ridge Trucks for the True American Hero Truck Giveaway contest

He felt that the players should go an protest in Washington if they wanted results and claimed to understand that black lives matter

The football player joined Donald Trump's New Jersey Generals in 1983 before joining the Dallas Cowboys in 1985

The football player joined Donald Trump's New Jersey Generals in 1983 before joining the Dallas Cowboys in 1985

Partnering with Rocky Ridge Trucks for the True American Hero Truck Giveaway contest, Walker has given a free customized, hand-painted, American-made 2018 Chevrolet Silverado 1500, worth $80,000 to a veteran or serviceman. 

He would go to play with the Minnesota Vikings, Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants before retiring back with the Cowboys in 1997

He would go to play with the Minnesota Vikings, Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants before retiring back with the Cowboys in 1997

The contest is open to any person with a decent record in public service in the military or a domestic first responder. 

Those selected as finalist will attend the National Automobile Dealers Association Convention in Las Vegas in March where a winner will be drawn. 

The football player joined Donald Trump's New Jersey Generals in 1983 before joining the Dallas Cowboys in 1985. 

He would go to play with the Minnesota Vikings, Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants before retiring back with the Cowboys in 1997. 

Walker - who was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1999 - also owns the Renaissance Man Food Services, a trailblazer for minority-owned food processors. 

The protest during the national anthem started during the 2016 NFL season when Colin Kaepernick sat and then knelt while playing with the San Francisco 49ers. 

Having talked with an actual veteran about why they knelt in remembrance to fallen soldiers, the football player and activist began kneeling during the anthem to pay his respects. 

A plethora of other players joined in on the protest after tweets from President Donald Trump referred to players as 'sons of b******s.'

The protest during the national anthem started during the 2016 NFL season when Colin Kaepernick (middle) sat and then knelt while playing with the San Francisco 49ers

The protest during the national anthem started during the 2016 NFL season when Colin Kaepernick (middle) sat and then knelt while playing with the San Francisco 49ers