Houston told 3,000 firefighters to stay home during Harvey

Nearly three thousand firefighters were told to remain home while Harvey battered Houston, even as county officials were issuing pleas for volunteer rescuers, said union boss Marty Lancon.

Thousands of Houston firefighters were told to stay home at the height of Harvey's flooding even as calls for help overwhelmed 911 dispatchers, the president of the city's firefighters union said Friday.

Nearly three thousand firefighters were told to remain home while Harvey battered Houston, even as county officials were issuing pleas for volunteer rescuers, said union boss Marty Lancon.

'Firefighters who are not scheduled to work are asked to refrain from coming into the station unless otherwise notified by HFD command,' read an August 27 memo obtained by KHOU.

'That was the most unbelievable, confusing, mind-boggling thing in dealing with the catastrophic event,' Lancon told the CBS affiliate.

Questions are emerging about the decision to tell nearly 3,000 firefighters in Houston to stay home as Hurricane Harvey battered the city

Questions are emerging about the decision to tell nearly 3,000 firefighters in Houston to stay home as Hurricane Harvey battered the city

City officials said the decision was based on the number of trucks and boats available, saying that additional crews would have had no equipment to use if they showed up. 

'I don't want to hear about lack of resources,' Lancton said. 'Emergencies are something you prepare for. You don't have the answers, but you prepare. In this case, they weren't prepared.'

As fast-rushing water chased people onto their rooftops, about 3,000 firefighters were instructed not to report to work on August 27, according to Lancton, an agonizing order for many eager to assist with rescues.

'We're sorry,' Lancton said, fighting back tears. 'Every Houston firefighter would put their life on the line for anybody without question, with a moment's notice, and this is not different.'

Houston Fire Chief Sam Pena acknowledged that three-quarters of the force was asked not to report, but said that the department was fully staffed.

'Everything we had available, we deployed in anticipation of that,' Pena said.

Firefighters put out a fire during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. The city says that its equipment was fully staffed, and that it didn't have the boats or trucks for more firefighters

Firefighters put out a fire during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. The city says that its equipment was fully staffed, and that it didn't have the boats or trucks for more firefighters

The decision against a full recall, which Pena said was made based on staffing needs during past disasters, left a crew of 900 firefighters responsible for 650 square miles of Houston. Many worked two or three days without a break.

Pena said he hadn't seen the data yet for response times from that Sunday but that in hindsight, he would have brought in more firefighters to make sure crews could rotate out each day.

The decision to not deploy more fire responders struck a nerve in southeast Houston, where Debbie Martinez and her 3-month-old granddaughter had waited for help as her home filled with water.

'There could have been people here to help us get out of here,' she said. 'It doesn't make sense.'