Saudi Arabian Airlines' dress code sparks Twitter fury

Saudi Arabia Airlines - the country's national carrier - has triggered outrage for issuing a strict dress code that requires women not to expose their arms or legs and men not wear shorts.

Saudi Arabia Airlines has sparked outrage after issuing a dress code that dictates female passengers should not expose their arms or legs.

The code of conduct 'requests' that its passengers not be 'clothed in a manner that would cause discomfort or offense to other passengers', which also includes garments that are 'too thin' or 'too tight'.

Saudi Arabia's national carrier also instructs men not to wear shorts, and the strict requirements have sparked a Twitter frenzy - some expressing their outrage and others arguing that it's a 'good step'.

Saudi Arabia Airlines has sparked outrage after issuing a strict dress code that dictates female passengers should not expose their arms or legs (stock image)

Saudi Arabia Airlines has sparked outrage after issuing a strict dress code that dictates female passengers should not expose their arms or legs (stock image)

The regulations were spotted in two sections of the airline's website - both now removed - one under the 'passengers' code of conduct' heading, and the other under its 'dress code' information.

It also states: 'Saudia may refuse to transport passengers or may remove passengers from the flight at any point for not complying with its dress code.'

The airline - which also bans the carrying or consumption of alcohol on its flights - also mentioned in its policy that passengers are breaking conduct if they have 'an offensive odor not caused by disability or illness'.

Twitter users were quick to respond. 

'Can British airlines refuse "offensive headdresses"?? Bet not!' mused one, while another wrote: 'Discrimination against women is #nothingtodowithIslam.'

'Passengers to be subjected to Islamic air control? We want to travel, not be subjugated by religion', ranted another. 

The regulations were spotted in two sections of the airline's website - both now removed - one under its 'dress code' information (pictured) 

The regulations were spotted in two sections of the airline's website - both now removed - one under its 'dress code' information (pictured) 

It is repeated under a different header (pictured), also mentioning that passengers are breaking conduct if they have 'an offensive odor not caused by disability or illness'

It is repeated under a different header (pictured), also mentioning that passengers are breaking conduct if they have 'an offensive odor not caused by disability or illness'

Others took the opposite stance. 

One Twitter user wrote: 'Good. About time an airline takes a stand on the nuisance of slovenly, unkempt and quite often drunk passengers. Well done #SaudiAirlines.'

Another branded it 'a good move indeed' while one praised the airline for making itself 'more convenient for personal culture'. 

As of Friday morning, all references to the dress code appear to have been removed by the airline. But passengers are still advised to wear loose-fitting clothing for their own comfort 

As of Friday morning, all references to the dress code appear to have been removed by the airline. But passengers are still advised to wear loose-fitting clothing for their own comfort 

Saudi Arabian Airlines also bans the carrying or consumption of alcohol on its flights

Saudi Arabian Airlines also bans the carrying or consumption of alcohol on its flights

Weighing in on the topic, Ali Al Ghamdi, the former Saudi head of tourism, told Saudi newspaper Makkah that clothing requirements were issued by the International Air Transport Association (IATA).

But a rep for the IATA told MailOnline Travel: 'The reports in the media that IATA issues guidelines on dress code are incorrect. 

'Dress code policy is entirely at the discretion of the airline.'

 

 

 

Twitter reaction was mixed, with some outraged by the dress code and others in praise of it

Twitter reaction was mixed, with some outraged by the dress code and others in praise of it

As of Friday morning, all references to the dress code appear to have been removed by the airline. But passengers are still advised to wear loose-fitting clothing for their own comfort.

'Tight-fitting clothes may naturally cause some discomfort,' the website states. 

In Saudia Arabia, all women, both foreign and local, must by law wear an abaya, a long loose garment that covers their clothes, in public places. It is one of the few Muslim majority countries to enforce this.

Saudi Arabia Airlines is yet to respond to MailOnline's request for comment.