May 19, 2017 13:38 GMT by dailymail.co.uk

25% of Brits lie to their boss about working from home

Thousands of employees across the UK are squirreling away extra holiday time - by taking advantage of flexible working arrangements.

It's a popular excuse for being absent from the office without burning through sick days or holiday time.

Yet a staggering one in four Brits have, in fact, been out of the country while claiming to be 'working from home'.

Research by a mobile network surveyed 1,500 office-based employees across the UK, finding that 24 per cent of them have bluffed their way abroad with the phrase.

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Home and away: The average Brit now works 3.5 days a month 'from home' ¿ or 42 every year

Home and away: The average Brit now works 3.5 days a month 'from home' – or 42 every year

Nearly a quarter of staff have manipulated the advent of technology to acquire roughly 3.5 days away from work, each month, the EE survey revealed.

That equates to a total of eight weeks of untitled leave, every year. 

Of the 24 per cent, a third of them have been on a European City break when they were meant to be working.

However, not all those questioned use the time for adventure. The survey also revealed that one in ten adults stay in bed all day, while - of those who actually get up -  36 per cent regularly don’t even bother to dress.

Meanwhile, almost one in ten (seven per cent) have used a 'home' day to facilitate a family day out, while 23 per cent use them to indulge in long lunches.

Trips to the hairdressers are also common (10 per cent).  

Get away! EE's study found 24 per cent claim to be working remotely, while actually abroad

Get away! EE's study found 24 per cent claim to be working remotely, while actually abroad

Pulling a fast one: Of the 24 per cent who lie about working remotely, a third of them have been on a European city break when they were meant to be grafting

Pulling a fast one: Of the 24 per cent who lie about working remotely, a third of them have been on a European city break when they were meant to be grafting

Predictably, however, it doesn’t always go to plan for the nation’s workers - as almost a quarter (23 per cent) have been caught out not being where they should have been after calling the office or joining a video conference call.

That ruse is even more likely to be rumbled if officials across Europe and America decide to widen the controversial laptop ban.

UK and EU representatives met with US counter-terrorism officials in Brussels, this week, to thrash-out a deal concerning transatlantic trips, which sees 65million people travel between Europe and North American on 400 daily flights, each year.

It comes just hours after Australia's Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, revealed that his government is also 'looking ... very closely' at a similar move. 

It would effectively stop people having access to anything greater than a smartphone in flight cabins. 

 

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